Love a Florida Senior? Here are Tips for Keeping Them Safe on the Road!

Love a Florida Senior? Here are Tips for Keeping Them Safe on the Road!

One of the most challenging aspects of getting older is the loss of independence that accompanies aging. Advancing age alone, however, is not necessarily a sign that the Florida senior you love should give up his or her car keys. According to the Center for Disease Control, over 40 million licensed drivers are over the age of 65.

Unfortunately, as drivers get older, they can be more at risk of being seriously injured or killed if they are involved in an accident. There is more to driver safety than buckling your seatbelt. If the Florida senior you love is eager to drive, let us share a few tips to help you keep him or her safe on the road.

1.Research senior-friendly cars.

Did you know that not every car may be appropriate for a senior driver? Certain cars have features that can help keep your senior loved one safer while driving. A car with safety features such as power seats, power windows and mirrors, an easier to grip steering wheel, a push start button, and keyless entry can help senior drivers feel more comfortable behind the wheel.

2. Encourage your loved one to make regular doctor’s appointments.

As we age, our bodies change. The senior you love may regularly visit the doctor’s office for check-ups and treatment plans for any medical conditions. If your senior loved one is driving, however, you may want to encourage him or her to meet with a primary care physician to discuss whether any prescription medications they currently take can impact driving skills. Regular checkups with an optician and ear specialist can also help your senior loved one monitor any hearing or vision loss that can increase their risk while driving.

3. Encourage your loved one to take a driver-safety course.

Most of us remember taking a driver safety course when applying for our driver’s license. It never hurts to refresh those skills! Did you know that your Florida senior loved one can enroll in an older driver education program? These programs are designed to increase awareness of age-related risks and will educate your senior loved one about how to help avoid these risks while driving.

4. Make sure your loved one knows his or her limits.

The senior you love may not feel comfortable driving in every situation. We encourage you to discuss your loved one’s driving limitations before he or she gets behind the wheel. Determining what driving conditions your senior loved one finds more challenging, for example, driving in the dark or when it is raining, can help protect both your senior loved one and other drivers on the road.

These are just a few of the ways you can help protect the senior you love on the road. Above all, remember, it is important to frequently check-in with your senior loved one to keep track of any changes in their health or functionality. Do not hesitate to ask us your questions or to seek advice about creating a legal plan to protect the senior you love.

Caregiving Basics You Need to Know in the New Year

Caregiving Basics You Need to Know in the New Year

Every year, millions of American families face the difficult decision of how to help an aging parent who can no longer fully take care of himself or herself. For many families, the answer is to provide needed caregiving services themselves. While this seems like an easy solution at first, it is not.

There is much to know about caregiving, and several initial questions to consider, include:

Are you qualified to take care of an elder parent?

Some aging loved ones require assistance with meal preparation, bathing, and getting dressed. Others may need assistance taking medications and short trips to the doctor’s office. Florida seniors with serious health conditions or mental illness, however, may need professional care.

Are you financially prepared?

Caregiving is expensive, but there are ways to obtain financial support. Although most seniors expect Medicare to help cover the costs of aging, often it cannot.  Medicaid and veterans benefits, however, may be available as resources. Further, long-term care insurance, Social Security income, and various tax deductions for out-of-pocket expenses may also apply.

How will caregiving affect your emotional and mental health?

Providing care for elderly parents can be emotionally and mentally challenging, especially as loved ones continue to age and their health declines.

If you can affirmatively answer these questions, or are committed to developing healthy caregiving strategies, you may also want to consider:

Family caregivers can be paid. If an aging parent has the resources to pay for a family caregiver, there is no reason not to explore this possibility. The key is creating the right contract for your needs. Do not wait to meet with an experienced elder care attorney about this type of contract.

Sibling conflicts. Caregiving responsibilities usually fall on one adult-child family member more than any other. This often leads to sibling strife even in the most “functional” families, and especially over issues concerning money, fairness and important health decisions. Discuss ways to prevent these issues now, as things may get harder in the future.

Moving in. Nursing homes and assisted living facilities are expensive. One cost-effective option, however, is to have your aging parent move into your home. As long as your relationship is healthy, it can be a rewarding experience for all involved and provide much needed care.

Taking care of yourself. The demands of family caregiving can lead to burnout and poor health. Often, we find these problems stem from putting an elder parent’s needs before your own. As a caregiver, try not to avoid your needs in this setting.

With over thirteen million Americans currently caring for their children and parents, we know you may need guidance on how to balance these responsibilities. We know this article also may raise more questions than it answers. Do not wait to contact our office to discuss your needs, and those of your family, today.

Why Health Care Documents are Critical to Your Estate Plan

Why Health Care Documents are Critical to Your Estate Plan

Many of our clients tell us that creating a last will and testament is the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about estate planning. While a will is a fundamental component of successful estate planning, including detailed health care documents in your estate plan is an effective way of ensuring any medical decisions made on your behalf are ones that you would approve of.

One of the main benefits of establishing advance directives is that you, as the creator, have the opportunity to create specific and detailed instructions with regards to the future medical care you wish to receive. Further, by creating advance directives, you have the ability to choose someone to act as your health care agent in the event you are unable to make medical decisions for yourself.

To help you make an informed decision about the types of planning documents you need, let us share three important health care documents that you should consider adding to your estate plan.

  1. Living Will

A living will is the first of these important health care documents. A living will is a legally-binding document that allows you to lay out your medical wishes in the event you are diagnosed with a terminal illness or experience a serious accident or injury. By creating this important planning document, you can provide as much detail as you like about your future medical treatment and end-of-life care wishes. This will lift some of the burden from your loved ones and will make it easier for them to make decisions about your care that align with your wishes.

  1. Health Care Power of Attorney

Through a health care power of attorney, you can designate an agent who has the authority to make medical decisions on your behalf in the event you are unable to do so yourself. It is almost impossible to plan for every conceivable circumstance, establishing a health care power of attorney can help accommodate for unexpected situations that arise. We want to share one cautionary note, however, about setting up a health care power of attorney. Be sure to choose someone you trust implicitly as your agent, as these types of decisions can be life and death.

  1. HIPAA Authorization

In order for your agent to gain access to your medical records as needed, he or she must have HIPAA authorization. HIPAA was created to protect your privacy when it comes to your health. Ensuring that your agent has the authority to access your records will make it easier for him or her to make medical decisions on your behalf if you become incapacitated and are unable to do so. Discuss with your estate planning attorney whether this authorization should be included as a part of your health care documents or as a stand alone document.

These are just a few of the health care documents you can add to your estate plan. Are you ready to discuss your legal planning needs and find out which documents fit best with your planning goals? Do not wait to get in touch with our office. As always, we are here to be a resource for you.

7 Tips for Evaluating Your Parents Potential Long-Term Care Needs Over the Holidays

7 Tips for Evaluating Your Parents Potential Long-Term Care Needs Over the Holidays

Choosing to visit your aging parent during the holidays can be a great gift from you to them. It is during these visits, however, that you may learn that your parents are not physically or mentally able to care for themselves as well as in the past. You may determine during your visit that your aging parents are having significant problems dealing with activities of daily living and may need more help in the home.

 

We know how difficult this realization can be for you and your parents. As you face these challenges together, it is important for you to determine what strategies may best provide the support they need. Let us share seven tips for talking to your aging parents this holiday season that we share with our clients, friends, family, and local professionals in our community.

 

  1. Are they having issues driving? As we age, driving becomes more difficult. It is not just the physical act of driving, but also, response times and observations. Be sure to let your parents drive you both short and long distances to determine how they are managing this task.

 

  1. How is their day-to-day health? Observe your parents throughout your visit, taking time to see how they are doing throughout the day. Are mornings easier? Do they go to sleep after dinner? How quickly can they move between tasks?

 

  1. Can they easily prepare meals? If your parents offer to prepare a meal, let them. Although many families go out to eat during visits or an adult child cooks, ask your parents to help. Be on the lookout for whether or not your parents have a hard time remembering frequently used recipes, where ingredients are placed, or remembering to turn off kitchen appliances, such as the oven.

 

  1. How many medicines are they taking? Medicines increase for many Older Americans. Ask them to share their medication list and schedule for taking prescriptions. Are there duplications? Can your parents tell you why they take specific medicines? Is anything expired? Do they need help opening bottles? There are many pharmacies now that will organize medications by day and time. Talk to your parents about this type of service and if it would be beneficial.

 

  1. What is the state of their house? If you can, stay at least one night in the home as you may not be able to observe the state of the house in a quick visit. Is it clean? It it well-maintained? Do your parents need help with organization or clutter?

 

  1. Is their estate planning up to date? Ask your parents about their estate planning. The documents within their planning, such as the durable power of attorney, will be necessary in a crisis should you need to make decisions for them. What documents do they have included in their estate plan? Who is their decision maker? Is there an attorney you may talk to in a crisis?

 

  1. Have they created a plan for long-term care? It is never too early to plan for long-term care. Ask your parents what plans they have created so far. Although this can be a difficult conversation to have, it is never too early to talk to them about what they want so you can both be prepared for the future.

 

We want you to know that we are here to help you answer these questions. We can work with your aging parents and you both now and in the new year. Do not wait to contact us to ask us your questions.

A Marriage in Your Family is Cause for Updating Your Estate Plan in the New Year

A Marriage in Your Family is Cause for Updating Your Estate Plan in the New Year

One of the most costly mistakes people can make, especially as they get older, is not having a comprehensive estate plan. For those who do have one, failing to regularly update it can be just as costly. Without a legally sound plan, there is no guarantee that your wishes will be honored and your property will go to the people you love or the organizations you support.

There is no better time to address this issue than at the start of a new year. Significant life changes or new tax laws, for example, may have occurred in the preceding calendar year or since your last update. Addressing your estate plan at the beginning of a new year offers the chance to get a jump start on the year to come.

One of the most common reasons to update an existing plan is marriage. Did you, your children or another family member named in your estate planning documents get married since your plan was created or last updated? An estate planning attorney could help you determine how that might affect your will, trust, beneficiary designations, insurance policies or other important estate documents.

Marriage changes family structure, and estate documents need to reflect those changes. For instance, if you were recently married, designating your spouse as a beneficiary to your property, or perhaps naming him or her as a personal representative to your will, would be something to handle right away. In the case of a living will, your new spouse should be made aware in writing of your health care wishes in the event you become terminally ill. A power of attorney document also could be crafted to give your spouse the ability to make decisions on your behalf relating to financial, legal and health care matters.

Estate planning is just the first part of the equation. You and your new spouse need to discuss your long-term care future. What you may not know is that when it comes to being able to afford the high cost of long-term care, you need to give your new spouse the ability to plan and work with an elder care attorney in the event of a crisis.

If the marriage is not your first, an additional set of considerations may apply. A review of previous estate documents would be required to understand how any prior arrangements would impact your plans moving forward. For instance, if you were contractually obligated through a previous divorce to keep your ex-spouse as beneficiary to a retirement account, you may not be able to update the beneficiary designation to your current spouse. Doing so could inadvertently cause a series of avoidable problems.

In any case, consulting with your estate planning attorney can provide the most efficient path to creating an overall estate plan that confidently meets your needs. We encourage you to ask us your questions. Do not wait to schedule a meeting to create the right estate plan for you now and in the new year.