Why You Need to Plan for Your Elder Care Law Needs Early

Why You Need to Plan for Your Elder Care Law Needs Early

Many seniors do not have elder care planning of any kind. Unfortunately, this means they are not prepared for a sudden crisis. This crisis could be a healthcare diagnosis, a car accident or a rapid decline in cognitive abilities. Most of the elder care planning you need as you age may only be completed when you have capacity. You risk losing the right to make choices you want if you have not planned for incapacity.

 

When you have not provided legal authority to another person, such as in your Florida durable power of attorney and Florida health care surrogate documents, there is no one who can step in and make your decisions for you should you be incapacitated. Through these estate planning tools your agent is given the legal authority to act as you would in specific instances. For example, if you were in a car accident and were unable to pay your bills each month, your agent would be able to do so.  Further, if you were to suddenly need long-term care such as in the skilled nursing facility, your agent would have the authority to to hire an attorney to assist him or her with this planning.

 

Unfortunately, when you do not plan ahead, and create the elder care planning documents you need, no one will have this authority. In the event of a crisis where you can go longer make decisions and have not created the documents to support you, your family may need to hire an attorney to start the Florida guardianship process. In the absence of legal planning, the guardianship process exists to first determine that you are truly incapacitated and then to select the right guardian to make decisions for you for the rest of your life.

 

While, at first glance, this may not seem to be the worst alternative, there can be significant downsides to the guardianship process. Let us share a few considerations with you.

 

1. The guardianship process is expensive. Your family will need to hire an attorney to represent them and a second attorney will also be appointed by the state to represent your interests. There will be court costs, medical examiners costs, and additional costs during the initial phase of this guardianship. This will quickly add up to thousands of dollars that could have been avoided by having Florida advance directives in most situations.

 

2. The lack of ability to plan for long-term care. Under almost every circumstance, you will no longer be able to plan to protect your life savings from the high cost of long-term care once you are under guardianship. Instead, the planning alternatives that work under your durable power of attorney, are no longer possible. Your family will have to spend your assets and income on the skilled nursing facility you need until they are depleted.

 

3. Increased family conflict and stress. Unfortunately, in the absence of choosing a decision maker early, your family may fight over who should be your guardian. We have seen countless arguments between spouses, children, and loved ones who each hire attorneys to fight over who should be the decision maker for a loved one. During stressful times like this, most of our loved ones will not be thinking clearly and will be unable to make rational decisions with regard to our care. Not only does this cause long-lasting friction for your family, it also incurs more costs with each person‘s attorney’s fees.

 

These are just a few of the reasons why it is crucial that guardianship not be your elder care planning choice. When you plan early and well, you can avoid scenarios where you will be forced to use your entire life savings to pay for your long term care needs. Don’t wait to talk to a member of our legal planning team about the help you and and your loved ones need.

How Could “Gray Divorce” Impact Your Elder Care Planning?

How Could “Gray Divorce” Impact Your Elder Care Planning?

There is no question that getting a divorce is a stressful and tense time period. Emotions are heightened as paperwork begins to pile up, meetings with attorneys become more frequent and discussions between ex-spouses become argumentative or sad. Did you know, however, that “gray divorces” or divorces that occur much later than life continue to be on the rise?

 

The Pew Research Institute reports that “among U.S. adults ages 50 and older, the divorce rate has roughly doubled since the 1990s. In 2015, for every 1,000 married persons ages 50 and older, 10 divorced – up from five in 1990, according to data from the National Center for Health Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau. Among those ages 65 and older, the divorce rate has roughly tripled since 1990, reaching six people per 1,000 married persons in 2015.” Does a divorce at 65 years of age more significantly impact an individual than when he or she is younger? What is the impact on elder care law planning?

 

It is crucial to plan for your elder care needs whether you are married or divorced. For divorced spouses, however, examining how your needs will be met in the future is critical. Revising your estate plan after divorce is an essential part of the process and the first step in preparing yourself for the future. For most seniors on a fixed income, it is important for you to not only plan for your estate but for your potential long-term care needs as well. Let us share a few tips on how to plan forward in light of divorce.

 

1. Your last will and testament may no longer reflect your wishes.

 

After divorce in Florida, any provisions in your last will and testament related to your ex-spouse will become invalidated. Under the law, your will treats your spouse as having died at the time of the divorce. This may or may not reflect your wishes. In order to decrease any confusion, new estate planning documents such as a last will and testament or a revocable trust agreement should be created and executed.

 

2. Change your durable power of attorney as soon as possible.

 

In many marriages, spouses act as each other’s agent under their durable power of attorney. That means, if one spouse becomes incapacitated, the other spouse can legally make decisions for him or her. Similar to the last will and testament, the former spouses are treated as having predeceased one another. This is a document that must be updated as soon as possible as to prevent a lapse of person with decision making authority.

 

3. Plan forward with your elder care attorney for long-term care.

 

There are more options available for married individuals than for single individuals when it comes to long-term care planning. Many of the remaining strategies require a minimum of sixty months to be in effect before the benefits can be received by the individual. There is no guarantee that any of us will be able to avoid the need for long-term care in the future. It is critical to plan early to know how you will be able to afford this care by yourself without spending all of your hard earned money on a nursing home.

 

Divorce is never easy. It can become more complicated later in life. It is important to adjust all legal documents and your long-term care planning to reflect this new life change. Do not wait to talk to us about what you need moving forward from this difficult time.

 

 

 

5 Things to Know About Filial Responsibility

5 Things to Know About Filial Responsibility

Did you know there is a possibility you could one day be responsible for an aging parent’s long-term care costs?  Filial responsibility is the legal and financial responsibility of a third party to pay for another’s unpaid expenses. Although it has only been enforced in a handful of states, over twenty-five states have these laws in place. Experts agree that as our states look for ways to pay for the long-term care costs for an increasing senior population, filial responsibility laws may gain traction.

 

What Is filial responsibility? How could it potentially impact you and your aging parents? Let us share the critical information about filial responsibility laws you need to know to help you plan.

 

1. The most common form of filial responsibility is the financial duty a child owes to a parent. If a parent is in need of long-term healthcare but cannot afford to pay, an adult child may become legally responsible. The Pittas case from Pennsylvania gives us a clear example of how this law could be used.

 

2. Filial responsibility laws are in place in over twenty-five states. While not all states have these laws, many do. With these laws in place, this responsibility could be assessed under certain circumstances and other states could seek to add these laws creating similar responsibilities.

 

3. The degree of responsibility varies from state to state. For example, in Arkansas, adult children are only responsible for paying for mental health care. In Connecticut, the law only applies to parents who are younger than 65. However, in other states there is full responsibility of costs for adult children over parents.

 

4. You can be sued if you do not pay the bill. Even if the bill comes without notice, these laws can give long-term care facilities the ability to sue if you do not pay. In this instance, and all elder care law scenarios, it is crucial for you and your parents to work with an attorney to plan for this potential issue as early as possible.

 

5. A Pennsylvania case reversed precedent and made the enforcement of filial responsibility laws a new trend. Prior to 2012, filial responsibility laws were rarely enforced. However, in Health Care & Retirement Corporation of America v. Pittas (May 7, 2012), the Pennsylvania Superior Court upheld a decision to make an adult son liable for a $93,000 nursing home debt.

 

If enacted and enforced, filial responsibility laws could have a tremendous impact on Florida seniors and their children. One of the best ways to plan ahead is to work with your elder care law attorney to discuss strategies and ways to pay for long-term care early. Do you have questions? You may contact us for more information.

 

Elder Care Law: Can You Give Me Tips to Find the Right Nursing Home for My Parent?

Elder Care Law: Can You Give Me Tips to Find the Right Nursing Home for My Parent?

As our parents age, a time may come when they are no longer able to live safely at home. Whether due to a crisis or as a complication arising from the aging process, their needs may increase to a care level where they need 24-hour assistance. This level of long-term care is not only expensive but is often best provided inside of a Florida skilled nursing facility.

 

Placing a parent or helping a parent select a nursing home is not an easy task. How will you choose the right facility for your parent? What should you look for? What should you avoid? How will you be able to monitor the care to make sure it is what your parent requires? How will you be able to afford it?

 

We help families with these questions every day and we can assist you. We want to share with you our top three tips that we share with our clients and professional advisors when they are seeking Florida elder care help.

 

Tip 1: Start off by making a list with your requirements.

 

What do you and your parent require from the Florida skilled nursing facility? Does the nursing home need to be a certain distance from you or your siblings? Does your parent require any specialty care? Is the nursing home equipped to meet specific care needs? How often are elder care conferences held? Before you go on a tour or sign a contract, make a list of your needs and make sure the facility is able to meet them.

 

Tip 2: Do your research.

 

Research can show you facilities that are in your parent’s home town and give you an idea of the services each skilled nursing facility provides to residents. Don’t hesitate to search for references from friends and family or to ask your elder care attorney for recommendations. Getting educated on your options and knowing what to expect can help you and your elderly parent with this transition.

 

Tip 3: Take tours of the skilled nursing facilities you select.

 

Narrow down your list from your research and visit each nursing home. Taking a tour of potential skilled nursing facilities can help you better understand and evaluate where your parent could be living. While on your tour, be sure to eat a meal and pay attention to how the staff interacts with the residents. Sitting in on a group activity can also allow you to have a better idea of the structure of the nursing home. Is it more of a family setting? Are residents stimulated? Are the levels of care represented similar to what your parent needs?

 

Don’t wait to get the help you need. This means communicating with all of your loved ones who will be involved in this process and working with a knowledgeable elder care law attorney. We work with our Florida seniors and their children to find solutions that provide excellent elder care at a cost the family is able to afford. While at first this may seem to be an insurmountable task, we are more than qualified, ready and able to assist you. Call us at (877) 977 – ELDER or contact us through our website to discuss the planning you need.

 

Elder Care Law: How to Be Prepared

Elder Care Law: How to Be Prepared

Elder care law is one of the most important areas of law we have, yet many Florida seniors and their loved ones are extremely unprepared. They fail to plan early and well for a potential future that involves significant long-term care needs. Unfortunately, it is commonplace for our aging population and their caregivers to rely on estate plans and these plans often only cover a part of their needs.

 

The key to aging well in Florida is to be fully prepared for any circumstance that arises as a result of the aging process. We want you and your family to be protected. While there are multiple elder care issues we can help you navigate, our goal is two-fold. We want you to receive the good long-term care you deserve and we want to find a ways to pay for it that will not impoverish you or your family.

 

Let us share four tips with you in this article.

 

1. Know the difference between estate plans and elder care law.

 

A common misconception is that estate planning and elder care law are basically the same thing. Estate plans, however, only make up part of elder law. Estate plans typically include a will and a trust, and basically cover the transfer of wealth and planning for death. By contrast, elder care law encompasses all legal matters that seniors and persons with disabilities face. These considerations are not limited to just issues regarding death, but also those of incapacity, as well.

 

2. Do your research.

 

It’s easy to chat with friends or family and emulate their end-of-life plans. If those plans only include estate planning, however, you put yourself in the position to face serious issues as you age. Research the best course of action for you based on your circumstances, because everyone deals with different health, disability and financial issues. What worked for Aunt Hilda or Grandma Jean may not suit you, so be sure to research all elder care law opportunities.

 

3. Ask the right questions.

 

During your pursuit for an elder care law attorney to help you plan ahead, be sure to ask your attorney the right questions for you. It’s common for elder care law attorneys to practice in one, two or a few areas of elder care law, not everything, so be sure your attorney fits your needs. Ask them what areas they focus on in, how many years they’ve been practicing law, and how to best be prepared for future meetings. By doing your research and asking the right questions, you can avoid hiring an attorney who will only help you with part of your needs.

 

4. Find out what you qualify for.

 

Your elder care law attorney can help you determine if you may qualify for public benefits programs to help you pay for the high cost of long-term care. These benefits can include Florida Medicaid to help pay for a long-term care facility, or even VA Pension Benefits.  It is a common misconception that you must be a disabled veteran to qualify for VA Pension Benefits. If you were discharged from service (without dishonorable conditions), served more than 90 days during a qualifying period of war, are permanently and totally disabled or aged older than 65, and your countable family income is below a yearly limit set by law, you most likely benefit for VA pension benefits to help pay for long-term care.

 

The key is to do your research, ask the right questions, and don’t rely on advice from friends or family. You need to find the right elder care lawyer for you. We work with families just like yours each and every day on finding the right elder care law answers for them and would be honored to answer your questions. Ready to start planning? Let us know by contacting us through our website or call us at (877) 977 – ELDER. We look forward to talking to you!

 

What Are The Signs My Senior Parent May Need a Caregiver?

What Are The Signs My Senior Parent May Need a Caregiver?

Many of our clients and their families ask, “What are the potential signs that my parent may need an in-home caregiver?” There may come a time when your parent is no longer able to live alone, but how will you know? The short answer is through observation and interaction. The following are key warning signs you should always be on the lookout for.

 

Many people think that age is the main factor when deciding whether or not they should get an in-home caregiver for their parent. While this is not entirely false, there are additional, important factors to look for in your parent, in addition to age. We will address those critical indicators.

 

1. Poor or limited mobility.

If your parent is no longer physically able to get around, or needs assistance when doing so, this is a sign that he or she may need someone in the house to help out. Mobility issues can lead your parent to be more vulnerable to tripping or falling which can lead to a detrimental injury.

 

2. Decline in hygiene.

Has your parent always been meticulous about his or her appearance? A noticeable change could indicate a decline in ability. Does your parent now need help with getting a bath and cleaning him or herself? Although your parent may be resistant, get help. Without this assistance, your parent could end up with an infection or illness from poor hygiene.

 

3. Signs of forgetfulness.

If your parent is developing symptoms of forgetfulness or irritation, you may need to be more vigilant in your oversight than usual. These symptoms can be precursors to more critical illnesses such as Alzheimer’s, dementia or medication issues. With these symptoms your parent could unknowingly place him or herself in harm’s way.

 

4. Inability to perform activities of daily living.

If your parent begins to exhibit an inability to perform daily tasks, such as cooking, cleaning, or paying bills, then they may need someone that can provide this assistance. There are certain responsibilities that cannot go unchecked or a serious issue could result; a caregiver or homemaker service may be able to provide this extra help that your parent needs.

 

These are just a few of the signs that you should be aware of when deciding whether your parent may be able to continue to live alone. We are here to help you and your family navigate these challenges and provide the elder care law guidance you need. Does this article raise even more questions for you? We are here to answer them for you. Call us at (877) 977 – ELDER (3533) or contact us through our website to schedule an appointment with Attorney Scott Selis.