A positive Alzheimer’s Diagnosis is a life-changing event both for the person receiving it and for those who care about him or her. Did you know that understanding the diagnosis and early stages of the disease are critical for identifying effective medical treatments, caregiving options, and future planning items aimed at providing long-term care?

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. Alzheimer’s is a brain disease and the most common form of dementia, which is a general term for memory loss and degenerative mental capability. Toxic changes in the brain occur long before any Alzheimer’s symptoms are exhibited. Abnormal protein deposits form plaques throughout the brain and cause healthy neurons to cease functioning. To diagnose Alzheimer’s, doctors conduct tests to assess memory impairment, cognitive reasoning skills, functional abilities, and behavioral changes. They also perform a series of tests to rule out other possible causes of impairment.

While there is no known cure for Alzheimer’s Disease, family caregivers and adult children can better understand a senior loved one’s diagnosis by asking the evaluating physician important questions, such as:

  • What tests or tools were used to determine the diagnosis?
  • What were you measuring when the tests were performed?
  • How will the disease progress?
  • What treatment options are available?
  • What care planning services do you provide?
  • What support services or resources are available to help with the disease?

Early detection usually provides the best opportunities for long-term care and access to clinical trials. Traditional and experimental drug and non-drug interventions can ease the burden of the disease, and slow memory loss and other symptoms. If diagnosed during more developed stages, specializing physicians can still impart caregiving strategies to enhance safety and maximize quality of life for as long as possible.

Understanding an Alzheimer’s Diagnosis also helps families plan for the future. For example, a trusted family member can obtain a durable power of attorney document that would allow him or her to make binding decisions on the elder adult’s behalf when the elder adult is no longer competent. Advance health care directives, medical privacy releases, and updates to estate plans are also important planning items for long-term care needs and inheritance wishes.

If you or someone you know would like more information or guidance on related legal issues, we are here to help. As an elder law firm, we are committed to providing legal counsel on matters relating to degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Contact us today to schedule a meeting.