Many of our clients and their families ask, “What are the potential signs that my parent may need an in-home caregiver?” There may come a time when your parent is no longer able to live alone, but how will you know? The short answer is through observation and interaction. The following are key warning signs you should always be on the lookout for.

 

Many people think that age is the main factor when deciding whether or not they should get an in-home caregiver for their parent. While this is not entirely false, there are additional, important factors to look for in your parent, in addition to age. We will address those critical indicators.

 

1. Poor or limited mobility.

If your parent is no longer physically able to get around, or needs assistance when doing so, this is a sign that he or she may need someone in the house to help out. Mobility issues can lead your parent to be more vulnerable to tripping or falling which can lead to a detrimental injury.

 

2. Decline in hygiene.

Has your parent always been meticulous about his or her appearance? A noticeable change could indicate a decline in ability. Does your parent now need help with getting a bath and cleaning him or herself? Although your parent may be resistant, get help. Without this assistance, your parent could end up with an infection or illness from poor hygiene.

 

3. Signs of forgetfulness.

If your parent is developing symptoms of forgetfulness or irritation, you may need to be more vigilant in your oversight than usual. These symptoms can be precursors to more critical illnesses such as Alzheimer’s, dementia or medication issues. With these symptoms your parent could unknowingly place him or herself in harm’s way.

 

4. Inability to perform activities of daily living.

If your parent begins to exhibit an inability to perform daily tasks, such as cooking, cleaning, or paying bills, then they may need someone that can provide this assistance. There are certain responsibilities that cannot go unchecked or a serious issue could result; a caregiver or homemaker service may be able to provide this extra help that your parent needs.

 

These are just a few of the signs that you should be aware of when deciding whether your parent may be able to continue to live alone. We are here to help you and your family navigate these challenges and provide the elder care law guidance you need. Does this article raise even more questions for you? We are here to answer them for you. Call us at (877) 977 – ELDER (3533) or contact us through our website to schedule an appointment with Attorney Scott Selis.