9 Ways to Discuss Florida Estate Planning with Your Aging Parents

9 Ways to Discuss Florida Estate Planning with Your Aging Parents

Whether or not your aging parents live close to you or in another state, such as Florida, there is never a wrong time to discuss their estate planning.

Unfortunately, studies continue to show us that less than fifty percent of all Americans have estate planning in place.

This becomes an increasing concern as your parents age and become increasingly susceptible to age-related health care issues or long-term care concerns.

Despite your concerns, it may be hard for you to start a conversation with your aging parents. We know, based on our experience, that there is never a wrong time to start the discussion. We encourage you to openly speak with your aging parents about what they need to ensure they are protected as much as possible.

Let us share with you nine ways you can begin discussing estate planning with your loved ones today.

1. Ask for all decision makers to be at the meeting with your parents. You want to have a meeting when all involved can be present. Ask your aging parents who they want to be included and make sure these individuals can be in attendance.

2. Set the meeting at a time that interruptions will be limited. This conversation can be difficult to have, and made even more so with frequent interruptions. Decide on a place and time when the necessary parties can not only be in attendance, but will not be pulled away during an important topic. 

3. Do not avoid difficult topics. Discussing death and incapacity and a lack of control can be hard for any of us. Simply because it is “hard” to talk about does not mean the topic should be avoided. It may help to create an agenda of what you need to discuss so topics will not be avoided or put off to another time.

4. Discuss everyone’s schedule and availability both now and in the future. A critical part of estate planning is naming a person who will have the legal authority to act for your parents in a crisis. This means that their decision makers will need to be available in a crisis. Talk about this openly together to ensure that everyone can be involved or if changes need to be made.

5. Ask you parents what their goals are. Your parents know better than anyone else what they want. Talk to them about their goals for their legacy, their living situation, the future as it is related to long-term care, and any other issues they wish to discuss. They need to feel supported and that their loved ones will help them achieve their goals.

6. Check in on finances as they are related to long-term care needs. Although it is not estate planning, elder law concerns should also be discussed together. Long-term care can be expensive and, in almost all instances, is not covered by traditional health care insurance or Medicare. Discuss together how you would be able to afford long-term care support, should it become necessary.

7. Know that different states have different laws. Each state in America is different when it comes to estate planning. While there are similarities, the law may not be the same. If your parents have estate planning from a different state, it may be time to update to estate planning documents that reflect Florida laws.

8. Make a list of questions. As we shared before, making a list of questions and topics can ensure that everything is addressed in your meeting together. Write down your questions, your parents’ questions, as well as anyone else who is involved in the meeting, leaving room for new questions that arise as a result of your conversation. Determine what you can answer together and where you will need the help of an experienced attorney. 

9. Schedule a meeting with an experienced attorney. Your parents need an experienced estate planning attorney who will be able to support them in creating the plan they need. Do not wait to schedule this meeting and get answers to everyone’s questions. Be sure to determine in advance who will attend this meeting and ascertain from the attorney’s office if adult children may be present in the meeting with their parents’ consent.

We encourage you to ask us your questions about this important topic. We know that this article may raise more questions than it answers and want you to have the support you and your aging parents need. Do not hesitate to reach out to our office and schedule a meeting on this issue or any elder care concerns.