5 Tips to Use When Talking to Your Parents About Long-Term Care Over the Holidays

5 Tips to Use When Talking to Your Parents About Long-Term Care Over the Holidays

Have you considered that one of the most common side effects of aging parents seems to be an inevitable change in family dynamics? After being taken care of by your parents your entire childhood, followed by enjoying a beautiful co-existence with them as adults, it may now be time to take care of your parents. This can be a daunting task, but one thing may be certain in all of this. Planning for long-term care will likely make everything go smoother. With the holidays and family time approaching, it may be a good time to begin the conversation of long-term care planning. When talking to your parents about long-term care over the holidays, try to use these 5 tips: 

  1. Remember this is likely as challenging for them, as it is for you. As people age, there can often be a lot of fear surrounding the loss of control and independence. There may also be feelings of embarrassment with their children they always cared for now caring for them. Since you will likely have spent time thinking and preparing for the conversation, extend your parents the same courtesy by not ambushing them. Consider calling or sending an e-mail a few days before your visit, letting them know you would like to talk about their long-term care plan. 
  2. This is about their wishes too. While you may have your own ideas about what is best for your parents, allowing them to participate in the decision making process also allows them to retain their dignity. 
  3. Provide information. Your parents may want to do long-term care planning, but have found the entire process overwhelming. If you have done some research on wills, long-term care insurance, life insurance, and Medicaid planning, you may be in a good position to help them understand some of the basics.  
  4. Offer to assist. Instead of just providing information and leaving your parents to do the rest, offer to see the long-term care process through with them. For example, you can assist them in locating an elder law attorney and attend the appointments with them. 
  5. Consider another messenger. You know the old saying about lashing out at the ones you love the most. If the talk does not go as planned, consider having a more neutral party, such as their physician, broach the topic, and then, you can step in to assist. 

While discussing long-term care planning with your parents can feel uncomfortable, you can take comfort in knowing they can relax in their golden years, once they have a secure plan for long-term care. For assistance establishing a long-term care plan, please reach out to our office to schedule an appointment.

 

The Danger Of Making Holiday Gifts When It Comes To Long-Term Care Planning

The Danger Of Making Holiday Gifts When It Comes To Long-Term Care Planning

‘Tis the season to give and receive, but did you know that this can have significant consequences if you need to apply for Medicaid in the next three to five years? Can gifts impact Medicaid eligibility? Yes, this can have impacts for both the giver and receiver.

 Regarding the gift giver, it should be noted that the IRS allows a tax-free annual gift of fifteen thousand dollars per person with an unlimited amount of donees. In other words, a wealthy donor could gift away over a million tax free dollars per year by gifting a hundred different people the maximum fifteen thousand dollars.

 It can be vital, however, to understand these are tax laws and Medicaid takes a different stance on gifting in terms of Medicaid eligibility. When a person’s assets are reviewed for Medicaid eligibility, this includes a “Look-Back” period of thirty to sixty months, depending upon the state. If it is discovered that the Medicaid applicant has gifted money in order to be eligible for Medicaid, the penalty is Medicaid ineligibility. The length of time of ineligibility is determined by the amount of the gift and the average cost of a private pay nursing home in the area.

 A person deemed ineligible for Medicaid due to gift giving has some options. It is possible for the gifter to collect the gift back, or reimbursement, in order to “un-do” the penalty. Even if possession of the money makes them ineligible for Medicaid, they can spend it down by temporarily paying for long-term care or making a home modification related to their disability until they reach eligibility status. There may also be a possibility of an undue hardship waiver, if Medicaid ineligibility will cause the person to go without medical care, food or shelter.

There may also be important impacts on the gift receiver. All states have an asset limit to be Medicaid eligible and it is not very high. In fact, many states have limits falling in the range of fifteen hundred to two thousand dollars. Even a small gift can push a Medicaid recipient over the eligibility limit. Any gift received must be spent within a month in order to avoid affecting Medicaid eligibility. A Medicaid recipient has options if they receive a gift. They can pay off debt, purchase a funeral trust or a Medicaid eligible annuity. If money is received before applying for Medicaid, the money can also be spent down in a similar fashion. 

If you will be giving or receiving money or other assets this holiday season and anticipate this may impact your Medicaid eligibility or someone else’s, contact our office to discuss your options.

 

Don’t Let Guilt Stop You From Hiring Quality Elder Caregivers

Don’t Let Guilt Stop You From Hiring Quality Elder Caregivers

At any given time, the majority of elder caregiving is performed by family members. Often, though, the elder’s health declines to the point that paid outside care services can be required for him or her. Whether due to an illness, like Alzheimer’s Disease, a debilitating injury or simply old age, the demands of elder health care can exceed even the most dedicated family caregiver’s capacity to give.

Shifting to paid care can be emotionally difficult, even when it is obvious that it is in an elder loved one’s best interest. A healthy transition can induce feelings of failure and guilt, especially if a senior loved one values his or her independence and resists.

Statements like, “I don’t need any help,” or, “I don’t want a stranger in my house,” can be crushing when you are trying to help. Just like a parent looks after the best interests of a young child, an adult child may need to look after the best interests of his or her elder parent.

Let us share a few suggestions for you to consider when launching into a paid caregiver dynamic:

  • Reassure an elder loved one that hiring help does not mean that you are going to abandon him or her.
  • Be present for initial meetings between the caregiver and an aging loved one to help establish rapport.
  • Show outside caregivers how to do things in ways that are familiar and pleasing to the senior adult to help them feel comfortable.
  • Tell an elder loved one that working with a care provider is something they can do to take part in his or her own care.
  • Include an elder loved one in the caregiver process by asking him or her to try it out for a week, and then listen to feedback.
  • When selecting caregivers, try to find a personality or cultural match to create a sense of common ground, although cultural differences also make for interesting combinations.
  • Once the relationship is established always check-in to keep an eye on things.

Above all, an elder loved one’s quality of life, and therefore, quality of care, is the most important objective in any caregiver relationship, whether family or paid. Feelings of guilt can be overcome in taking steps to achieve this important objective. We work with families each day to solve challenges just like the one described here. Let us know how we can help you and your loved ones today.

Caregiving Basics You Need to Know in the New Year

Caregiving Basics You Need to Know in the New Year

Every year, millions of American families face the difficult decision of how to help an aging parent who can no longer fully take care of himself or herself. For many families, the answer is to provide needed caregiving services themselves. While this seems like an easy solution at first, it is not.

There is much to know about caregiving, and several initial questions to consider, include:

Are you qualified to take care of an elder parent?

Some aging loved ones require assistance with meal preparation, bathing, and getting dressed. Others may need assistance taking medications and short trips to the doctor’s office. Florida seniors with serious health conditions or mental illness, however, may need professional care.

Are you financially prepared?

Caregiving is expensive, but there are ways to obtain financial support. Although most seniors expect Medicare to help cover the costs of aging, often it cannot.  Medicaid and veterans benefits, however, may be available as resources. Further, long-term care insurance, Social Security income, and various tax deductions for out-of-pocket expenses may also apply.

How will caregiving affect your emotional and mental health?

Providing care for elderly parents can be emotionally and mentally challenging, especially as loved ones continue to age and their health declines.

If you can affirmatively answer these questions, or are committed to developing healthy caregiving strategies, you may also want to consider:

Family caregivers can be paid. If an aging parent has the resources to pay for a family caregiver, there is no reason not to explore this possibility. The key is creating the right contract for your needs. Do not wait to meet with an experienced elder care attorney about this type of contract.

Sibling conflicts. Caregiving responsibilities usually fall on one adult-child family member more than any other. This often leads to sibling strife even in the most “functional” families, and especially over issues concerning money, fairness and important health decisions. Discuss ways to prevent these issues now, as things may get harder in the future.

Moving in. Nursing homes and assisted living facilities are expensive. One cost-effective option, however, is to have your aging parent move into your home. As long as your relationship is healthy, it can be a rewarding experience for all involved and provide much needed care.

Taking care of yourself. The demands of family caregiving can lead to burnout and poor health. Often, we find these problems stem from putting an elder parent’s needs before your own. As a caregiver, try not to avoid your needs in this setting.

With over thirteen million Americans currently caring for their children and parents, we know you may need guidance on how to balance these responsibilities. We know this article also may raise more questions than it answers. Do not wait to contact our office to discuss your needs, and those of your family, today.

Do You Know the Ways You Can Say Thank You to a Caregiver?

Do You Know the Ways You Can Say Thank You to a Caregiver?

While many of us consider November and Thanksgiving the season of giving back, did you know that November is also National Family Caregivers Month? This is a great time to show your appreciation and gratitude to the caregiver in your life. Whether your caregiver is a hired professional that is considered part of the family or an unpaid family member who sacrifices his or her time to care for your loved one, being a caregiver is one of the most selfless roles there is.

Caregiving is a full-time profession that goes further than a typical nine-to-five job. Being a caregiver is a 24-hour, 7 days a week commitment that follows the caregiver home each day. Many caregivers share that because of the intense nature of the position, they frequently neglect to take care of their own health and well-being. This is why we want to share with you four ways to say thank you to the caregiver in your life this National Family Caregivers Month and into the remainder of the holiday season.

  1. Educate yourself about caregiver health.

Caregivers spend so much time taking care of your loved one, they sometimes neglect to take care of themselves. Becoming familiar with signs that your caregiver is overwhelmed and may be in need of some time off is one way that you can show your appreciation for your caregiver.

  1. Encourage respite breaks.

Respite care is an effective way of allowing the caregiver in your life to take a well-earned break. These programs provide a place where your senior loved one can go and interact with other seniors in a supervised facility, so you know they are still being watched over and their needs taken care of.

  1. Propose counseling or support groups.

Sometimes, the best gift is just having somebody to talk to. Your loved one’s caregiver may not feel like they can openly discuss their frustrations or feelings with you. Encouraging him or her to attend one-on-one counseling or a caregiver support group can provide an outlet for the caregiver to discuss their feelings and receive advice from people who can relate.

  1. Purchase a small gift.

You do not need to spend a lot of money to give your caregiver a meaningful gift. Purchasing a gift card to his or her favorite coffee shop for an afternoon pick-me-up, or offering to take the caregiver out to lunch can help put a smile on his or her face.

Above all, remember to say thank you to the caregiver in your life. A simple thank you can be especially meaningful and shows the caregiver that you recognize and appreciate the work he or she is performing. Do not hesitate to contact our office if you would like some more ideas on how to say show your appreciation to your caregiver this holiday season.